D-Day minus 1

The Secret Language of D-Day

Everything about World War II is full of superlatives.  There is nothing about the planning, logistics, espionage and execution of World War II that is not amazing to the

French Underground

French Underground

point of being incomprehensible.  The courage and fortitude of the troops was so heroic that they all command our honor and respect.  No wonder they keep using the War as a a topic for movies that never grows old.

One little known aspect of the War, and D-Day in particular is the work of the

underground networks.  British and American  groups worked with the French to assist in gathering information as well as sabotage.  In the movie, The Longest Day, a resistance group is huddled together around a radio, waiting for a BBC broadcast.  There are certain phrases that carry hidden messages within.  An advance notice of the

BBC messages

BBC messages

impending invasion came at 9:00 PM, June 1, 1944

“Les sanglots longs des violins de l’automne”  (The long sobs of the violins of autumn)

This meant the invasion would happen soon, within the next few weeks.  The second half of the message came at 8:15 PM on the night of June 5.  The invasion would begin within the next 48 hours

“Blessent mon coeur d’une angueur montone”  (Wound my heart with a monotonous

Ike and troops

Ike and troops

langour)

One final announcement,  “Jon has a long moustache.”  and the word was “GO!”

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